Meiji and Showa Constitution Meiji and Showa Constitution Introduction Constitution is the fundamental framework formulated in each country around which their governmental and legal systems are woven so as to guide the respective nation effectively, while ensuring the provision of civil rights. Since then, following World War II, Japan adopted its current Constitution, the Japanese Constitution of 1946. Yet, its first modern constitution, the Meiji Constitution, was not enacted until comparatively recently (1889). Takii's own argument discounts textual analysis of the Meiji Constitution in favor of treating what he calls Japan's “actual constitution” (p. 96). "The Meiji constitution cannot be said to have promoted harmony. text to the analysis of the presentJapanese Constitution. Second, the symbolic emperor system, rather than positioning the Emperor as a totalitarian monarchy as the Meiji Constitution did, is a far better fit with Japan’s social traditions. The Diet, whose members were elected by the first post-war general election in April 1946, discussed the draft intensively. Since then, following World War II, Japan adopted its current Constitution, the Japanese Constitution of 1946. It also had restricted value as a charter of personal values. The Japanese Monarchy before the Meiji Constitution: The Monarchy of Japan was founded in 660 BC and is the oldest continuously reining monarchy in the world. Yet, its first modern constitution, the Meiji Constitution, was not enacted until comparatively recently (1889). The Meiji document consisted of two main parts: (1) The Charter Oath and (2)The Imperial Rescript. The rights of subjects, as stated in it, were in all cases described as 'within the limits of the law', or 'within limits not prejudicial to peace and order.'" Though the draft constitution was fundamentally different from the Meiji Constitution, it was submitted to the Imperial Diet as an amendment of the Meiji Constitution by the Emperor’s order. The document was designed to reinstate the power and position of the Emperor of Japan. The Meiji Constitution was technically revised in 1947, but it was an entirely new document under its same official name, fashioned after the US Constitution by the occupation forces. In it, the Emperor was reduced to a figurehead; the Prime Minister elected by the Diet, and the use of force and role of the military severely curtailed. Japan boasts the second largest economy in the world and almost two thousand years of history. He grants the constitution “unifying and symbolic roles” (p. 97), but he devotes most of his concern to the “viable national structure” (p. … 64) The Meiji Constitution, the Kempo, which promulgated on February 11, 1889 by the Emperor Mutsuhito and came into effect after the formal opening of the bicameral parliament on November 1890 as a whole was based on the provision that accorded a position to the Emperor above the law and made him the very source of the law. It was based upon a Prussian Model and consisted of some 76 articles in … The committee completed its task in a week, and the draft was publicized as a wholesale amendment to the Meiji Constitution in March 1946. While the Meiji Constitution contained trappings of western con-stitutions,'o such as the creation of executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of government, it lacked the checks and balances of, for ex-ample, the American Constitution, and the separation of powers evi-